Spotlight on Lucid users – Australian Museum

amlogo2_smlIn 1827 Australia’s first public museum, the Sydney Museum or Colonial Museum, was established with the initial purpose to procure ‘many rare and curious specimens of Natural History’. Subsequently named the Australian Museum in 1836, today the Museum plays a leading role in taxonomic and systematic research and education and over the years has developed an internationally recognised collection of over 18 million cultural and scientific objects.

A decade ago, as part of its educational role, the Museum started producing a series of Lucid keys for identifying specific groups of insects and reptiles present in New South Wales. Now that these keys can be more easily accessed across the Internet, they have recently been transferred to the Lucid Key Server Player.

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Spotlight on Lucid users – MyCrop Diagnostic keys

Wheat splashWhen Lucid was first developed almost 20 years ago, the main focus was on capturing the expertise of taxonomists to develop Lucid-based, interactive identification tools for a range of different organisms and users. More recently, the range of applications of Lucid has broadened. In particular, agronomists and plant protection experts have been using Lucid to develop diagnostic tools for use by advisors and farmers to help determine the cause of crop disorders and what to do about them.

The MyCrop (https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/mycrop) team within the Western Australian Department of Agriculture and Food has developed a series of interactive tools to bring “crop diagnostics to the paddock”.

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